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BEAVER (Castor ceradersis)

The beaver is the largest rodent in North America. Their average weight ranges from 30-50 pounds and its body is covered with a gray under fur with brown-black guard hairs over this under fur. It has webbed feet and a flattened dorsoventrally scale-like almost hair less tail, making it suitable to an aquatic environment. The tail is also used in helping it sit upright and as a communication device (slapping it on the water). The beaver has large front incisor teeth, which it uses to cut trees down for food (bark) as well as dam and lodge building materials.

Beaver habitat can be anywhere there is a year round supply of water. They are the only animals that can alter its environment to suit its needs (dams). It is these dams that can bring it into direct conflict with humans. Flooding is required for the beaver to ensure that its pond doesn’t freeze solid in the winter and to obtain food without having to travel far from the safety of the water.

Beaver’s mate during January-February and the young are born around June (average litter contains 2-4). The offspring remain with the colony for about 1-½ years, at which time they are forced out, sometimes violently, by the adults (which mate for life). It is during this dispersal (fall/spring) that beaver complaints increase as young look for their own territory.

Most beaver complaints result from their damming and feeding activities. Flooded beaver ponds can cause road damage, flooded timber, flooded yards and basements and in residential areas, backed up sewer systems. Their feeding can quickly decimate trees along the shoreline with a preference for poplar, maple, birch and ornamental/fruit trees. This damage increases dramatically as the fall season approaches. A risk is also present in the beaver spreading diseases to humans. The most common is giardia lamblia, which is a parasite found in beaver droppings, which can cause health concerns in humans and pets, if beavers are in residential water supplies or popular swimming holes.

Control measures include live catching and relocating beavers to unoccupied watersheds not connected to where it was removed. Beavers should not be relocated after August or while raising their young. Permits must be obtained from the government to handle beavers in this manner.

If flooding is the problem, flood control devices can be installed if certain conditions are met. This is an expensive alternative and the conditions must be right. The tearing out of any dams is illegal, unless a permit to do so is obtained. Shooting is also illegal. There are no repellents effective for beaver control.

At Advanced Wildlife Control, I do remove beaver dams. As these dams can hold back literally tons of water, dam removal should be a slow and deliberate process. My expertise at dam removal has been gained through years of experience. It is important to re-state that no dam may be removed or tampered with unless the necessary permit(s) are obtained.

HRM beaver control provider since 2000. Also work performed for Department of Natural Resources, Department of Transportation, Department of National Defence and several town and municpality water commissions.


Call Mike at 497-2582 to solve your beaver problem.

According to Department of Natural Resources record keeping, Advanced Wildlife Control does more Beaver removals than any other company in N.S. - a testament to our professionalism and reasonable prices.


By contacting Advanced Wildlife Control, you are getting a truly N.S. owned and operated business, not a franchise company from somewhere in Canada and/or the U.S. Franchises can mean higher costs for you.  The N.S. Wildlife Act requires individuals working as a nuisance wildlife operator to be licensed. I am fully licensed pursuant to the N.S. Wildlife Act. To ensure you are dealing with a licensed operator, you should ask the operator to produce their license.