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PEST CONTROL OF MICE & RATS (click for more information on rat control).

Most common species of mice are the common house mouse, the white-footed mouse and the deer mouse.

House mouse (Mus musculus): A small slender rodent with a slightly pointed nose, protruding large eyes and scantily haired ears and a nearly hairless tail with obvious rings. They are generally grayish-brown with a gray belly. These mice can live in either homes or outside but have a tendency to enter buildings when there is colder weather or heavy rains wash them out of their outside burrows. They are mainly nocturnal but can be seen during the day but this does not mean that their numbers are high.

Nests are constructed of shredded fibrous material and are usually in the shape of a ball woven together and about 4-6 inches in diameter. Breeding can occur all year but is most prevalent in the spring and fall A female may have 5-10 litters per year with an average of 5-6 per litter. The young are weaned at 3 weeks of age and can reproduce at 10 weeks of age.

House mice can enter structures through openings as small as one quarter inch in diameter. They can cause structural damage by their chewing and can cause extensive damage to insulation inside walls and attics. They have been known to chew on wiring to obtain the insulated coating for nesting material. Other signs of their presence include droppings, tracks, staining from urine, the sounds of their chewing (visually on food items) and moving through the walls and ceilings and visual sightings. Nesting areas will have a strong musky smell.

Although house mice can carry several diseases (35) that can be transmitted to humans, good hygiene and cleaning practices can greatly reduce any transmission of viruses to humans. These can occur through direct contact with the mice or their fecal matter and urine or through indirect contact through bites from fleas and mites that are on the mice. Although there have been incidences of human illness due to contact with house mice in North America, they are a rare occurrence. In heavily infested areas, professional cleaning may be needed.

White-footed/Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus):  These mice have white feet, usually a white under-belly and sides with brownish upper colors. The colors between the underside and top are separated very distinctly. They have a tail that is as long as the entire body. In comparison to house mice, they have much larger eyes and ears. As with house mice , most of their activity is outdoors but they will seek entry into structures when the weather turns colder or they are flooded out of more natural den sites. They are also nocturnal but can be seen during the day which does not necessarily indicate high numbers.

These mice species can breed year round but again the bulk of the breeding takes place in the spring and fall. Litter sizes vary from 1-8 young but the average is 3-5. Females may have between 3-5 litters per year. The young are weaned at 2-3 weeks of age and can breed themselves at 7-8 weeks of age.

The damage that these can create is the same as house mice but they have a greater tendency to have caches of food hidden in areas they feel secure about. They can enter structures through openings as small as one quarter inch in diameter. They are not as big on chewing as are house mice but they can and will nest in insulation in the walls and attics. They can also strip wiring of its insulated coating for nesting material. Signs of their presence include droppings, tracks, staining from urine, the sounds of them moving through the walls and ceilings and visual sightings.
 
These mice can carry diseases (35) that can be transmitted to humans (hantavirus – a respiratory infection being the main one transmitted by deer mice). Human infection from contact with mice through direct contact with handling mice or their fecal/urine can occur. Also, transmission can occur through bites from fleas and mites that are on the mice. Although these are a possibility, occurrences in North America are rare. Good hygiene and cleaning practices will go a long way in reducing any infections that may occur. In heavily infested areas, professional cleaning may be required.

At Advanced Wildlife Control I will do a thorough inspection of the home to locate where possible entry points are. I also offer several approaches to solving your mouse issue including but not limited to habitat modification, repellents and non toxic methods.

Call Mike at (902) 497-2582 or contact Mike through the web-site.